Why Study Drums/Percussion With Me?


This is an update of a post from my old blog a few years ago:

Being a drummer is hard. To be a drummer is a life force. You have to be motivated to even deal with this instrument.
~ the late, great, jazz drummer, Roy Brooks


I've been teaching drums & percussion since the '70s. While I have taught hundreds students over the course of my drumming career, a good question for anyone would be: 

Why study drums/percussion with me?

I ask myself that often. I think it's important for me to continually look at what I'm doing, what I'm presenting to others. It’s also important for me to give something tangible to my students. I’m not in this to just collect their money and then pass out exercises from some drum book. I really want my students to get a wider experience.

So, if you study with me, whether drum set, hand drums, Gongs, or percussion, what should you expect to get with your lessons?

    technical exercises
    mental exercises
    rhythmic explorations
    why we do things
    how to be a ‘musician’
    how to work with others
    how to play solo
    how to think
    playing within a context
    playing outside of a context
    the nature of energy
    motions through time & space
    accidents & non-accidents
    extended techniques
    the motion of water
    the flow of air
    composing
    improvising   
    philosophy
    spirituality
    science
    physics
    astronomy
    mysteries & mayhem

At least that’s what I strive for, whether it’s a master class, workshop, one-off lesson, or a weekly lesson. That’s why I mostly teach from my own books and materials, because drumming is more than just playing notes on drums—drumming is a way of life. It is deep, it is full, it is all encompassing. So if you want to study with me, don’t expect just a few notes on paper and then you’re on your way. Expect much more!

~ MB

PS - If you are in the Milwaukee/Chicago area, or just passing through, contact me for regular or one off lessons.

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